IN THE PRESS
__________________



The BBC on the DC Punk Archive and Punk the Capital


_______________

 

USA
Scheduled for completion in late 2015, “Punk the Capital” illuminates the early punk scene with a focus on the infamous Madams Organ artists collective. Stepping inside this anarchic rowhouse transports the viewer to the late 70’s, a time full of discovery and sense of possibility for well known figures such as Henry Rollins and Ian MacKaye. It was also where seminal bands such as the Bad Brains, Black Market Baby, and the Teen Idles took off and where the sound and ideas behind “D.C. harDCore” truly began. PUNK ROCK PLANET
_____________


UK
"In a nod to DC punk’s history of community activism, they are planning special screenings and DVD tie-ins to benefit local education and social justice nonprofits upon Punk the Capital’s scheduled late-2015 release. The filmmakers have also been working with the DC Public Library to develop a punk archive and share the exhaustive trove of material they’ve amassed, including reams of aging Super-8 footage badly in need of preservation. (Details on both efforts here.) There’s that communitarian thing again. To join it, click on the widget." MUSIC FILM WEB

____________



USA
While this new one features some of the same talking heads – and let’s face it, Ian MacKaye is essential – it looks decidedly more artful with an abundance of stunning archive footage of Bad Brains, Minor Threat and all the greats. So who cares that there’s two new documentaries on the subject? I say the more the merrier. GROLSCH FILM WORKS
 ____________
 USA
Paul came to Washington in 1978 from Long Island. He didn’t really intend to stay, but he was drawn into the fervent, fertile scene that coalesced at Madam’s Organ — not the Adams Morgan blues bar of today but an artist’s collective on 18th Street NW that hosted music and film. “The Organ itself was a very open-minded place,” Paul said. “That was one of the best things about it. One of the things that really attracted me was the closeness of the audience and the bands. They were often the same people. You’d have people in the audience this week and next week they’d be forming a band, too.” That kind of sums up punk in a nutshell. WASHINGTON POST
___________________________


(France)
Décrite comme “une ville dans laquelle on n’aurait pas imaginé une scène punk exister”, Washington se retrouve ici exposée sous un nouvel angle : celui d’une jeunesse qui, étouffée par l’omniprésence du politique, permet à la mouvance punk de s’exporter sur les terres du Capitole.Comme beaucoup de mouvements, le punk de D.C. avait son lieu emblématique que le documentaire évoque : le Madams Organ, où gens de tout horizon se mêlaient et dans lequel la naissance du hardcore s’est opérée en souterrain, durant les années conservatrices de la présidence Reagan. LES INROCKS


___________________________
UK

"For the past ten years, James and co-director Paul Bishow have been painstakingly making a documentary about the early years of DC punk using archive footage, much of which was filmed by Bishow at the time and has never been seen before." Dale Shaw for the QUIETUS



___________________________


USA


Filmmakers and punk scene vets James Schneider and Paul Bishow have spent years working on the penultimate chronicling of the DC punk and harDCore scenes that they’ve long been a part of. The pair have spent countless hours pouring through vintage concert performances and conducting interviews with the likes of Ian Mackaye, Henry Rollins, Jello Biafra, Tesco Vee, Jeff Nelson and a bunch more. DYING SCENE


___________________________



(France)
CHRONIC'ART 
___________________________



Washington D.C.’s underground music scene forever altered the definition of punk, transforming it from nihilist towards something constructive. Within this unlikely town in 1979, generations, musical genres and powerful personalities created a volatile mix that changed music and culture around the world. - See more at: http://louderthanwar.com/punk-the-capital-watch-trailer-for-new-film-spotlighting-early-dc-punk-scene-in/#sthash.Ac2HtKcJ.dpuf


 (USA)
“Punk the Capital, Straight from Washington D.C.,” directed and produced by veteran D.C. filmmakers James Schneider and Paul Bishow, captures the essence of D.C. punk from its source and steers shy of nostalgia, making this history relevant 35 years later." LOUDER THAN WAR


______________________
UK

The unfathomable, concentrated eruption that was early 80’s DC punk and hardcore is documented in ‘Punk The Capital’, a film 10 years in the making, and featuring practically every DC music luminary. You can see the amazing trailer and possibly throw the film a few quid to get it finished, right HERE.SABOTAGE TIMES

______________________


USA
"To this day, the underground music scene of the late ’70s and early ’80s remains fairly unexamined (with perhaps the exception of Seattle’s Nirvana) so as much as this documentary might bring some of that music further into the light, it would makes its production a worthwhile cause." THE SNOBETTE


_____________________


USA

Punk the Capital! Chronicling the History Of D.C. Punk ! An interview with filmmakers Paul Bishow and James Schneider.

Does this documentary try to flesh out details or elements that books like Dance of Days could not, or did not?

James and Paul: ... "We dive back into what happened before then, in the late 70s, and then after, with harDCore. We get to the heart of why DC Punk has such staying power, why harDCore had to happen, and why DC was such a fertile ground for this new scene. The answer to these questions come straight out of that transitional moment, and specifically the Madams Organ artists co-op. It’s something you can pick up on when all the pieces are assembled and when you see all the interconnections between the generations and how they perceived each other. LEFT OF THE DIAL
Washington D.C.’s underground music scene forever altered the definition of punk, transforming it from nihilist towards something constructive. Within this unlikely town in 1979, generations, musical genres and powerful personalities created a volatile mix that changed music and culture around the world. - See more at: http://louderthanwar.com/punk-the-capital-watch-trailer-for-new-film-spotlighting-early-dc-punk-scene-in/#sthash.Ac2HtKcJ.dpuf
 ______________________


USA

Schneider, who has been going to local punk shows since a 1986 (One Last Wish) gig, has directed several documentaries and a sci-fi film, The End of the Light Age. Bishow managed the Biograph, a long-gone repertory theater, and shot lots of late '70s footage of bands at the Madam’s Organ artists collective.CITY PAPER (DC)
______________________


France
"Ce que je peux faire pour vraiment vous convaincre, c'est vous parler brièvement du réalisateur-instigateur du projet qui s'y connait sacrément en fabrication de reportages sur les groupes de wock n' woll qui envoient du bois, et qui aurait bien besoin d'un coup de paluche amical. On cause ici de James Schneider (à gauche sur la photo), réalisateur de Blue is Beautiful, indispensable documentaire sur The Make Up (dont on avait utilisé des extraits dans notre propre interview vidéo de Ian Svenonius), et de The Band That Met The Sound Beneath, documentaire sur Panico (qu'on a aussi interviewés) à la recherche "des sons de l'or". Il s'est associé pour l'occasion avec  Paul Bishow, maitre es Super-8 et boss d'I Am Eye, amoureux devant l'éternel du punk (à droite avec la caméra), tellement qu'il a même choisi de déménager à Washington pour être plus prêt de l'épicentre historique du mouvement." THE DRONE


______________________

USA


"The filmmakers are intimately familiar with the scene they chronicle. Schneider is a D.C. native who grew up in the punk and skate scenes of the ’80s and has gone on to direct and produce films and music videos such as Blue is Beautiful (1997), featuring Dischord band The Make-Up. Bishow moved to D.C. in the late 1970s and filmed the punk scene via Super-8, making dozens of short films with punk bands."AMOEBLOG


______________________
USA


One of the things that has always struck me as a bit odd is that when people talk about the “core” breeding grounds for the punk rock movement, Washington, DC is almost always left out of the discussion completely. Now, thanks to filmmakers James Schneider Paul Bishow, that wrong is being righted, with their documentary “Punk The Capital” entering the final stages of production. DEATH AND TAXES
______________________


(Washington D.C.)

"That Bishow was living in D.C. during this time and already documenting the scene adds to the documentary's credibility. He and Schneider are editing "Punk the Capital" in the same Adams Morgan apartment Bishow and other artists used as their home base off and on for 30 years" WTOP


______________________


USA

"Punk the Capital" is an exploration/ road map of how the 1970s music scene begat what became harDCore in the 1980s. Way before cell phones captured every other minute, this movie looks to  preserve raw and rare footage combined with primary source interviews and memories straight from the horse's mouth. We are lucky to have so many voices still alive to tell the tale - among them Alec and Ian MacKaye, Cynthia Connolly, Xyra Harper and Henry Rollins. DC ROCKS
______________________



USA
Old school punk rock doesn’t get much more iconic than Washington DC’s vibrant scene during the ’70s and ’80s, and DC locals James Schneider and Paul Bishow are trying to bring that rock epoch to a wider audience. Punk The Capital, Straight From Washington DC is an upcoming documentary — featuring legends such as Henry Rollins, Ian MacKaye, and H.R. of Bad Brains — that explores the power and fury of some of punk’s earliest roots.ZUMIC

______________________


 
(USA)
' “There was a whole music scene, pre-1979, that had an identity and it had pioneers in their own right,” Schneider says. He’s referring to bands like Urban Verbs, White Boy, The Razz, and The Slickee Boys, which came along before D.C.’s underground rock scene began to give way to a faster, brasher hardcore sound. It’s a transition that some would call a split, Schneider says, but it also sprung from intentional cooperation between generations, in which those older, established bands extended a hand to the younger kids who would become D.C.’s hardcore pioneers. “Basically, we’re tracing that whole generation shift,” Schneider says.' NPR